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English Church Architecture -

Norfolk.

 

BLO' NORTON, St. Andrew (TM 012 797)     (April 2007)

(Bedrock:  Upper Cretaceous, Upper Chalk)

 

There is not a great deal to say about this heavily restored church (shown left, from the south), consisting of a nave and chancel built as one, a modest W. tower rising in two stages, and a little N. porch constructed of rendered brick and timber (illustrated below right).  The basic fabric of the building is thirteenth century in date, however, as shown, in particular, by the relatively high tower arch bearing a single flat chamfer which continues uninterrupted down the jambs.  The tower is lit from the west by a wooden Y-traceried window, set in what must formerly have been a double-flat-chamfered doorway; the W. window then, was probably the lancet above, which may still be old in part.  A second, perhaps partly old, lancet, pierces the N. wall of the chancel, but the lancet and two Y-traceried windows in the chancel S. wall have been entirely renewed, even though their irregular positions suggest a mediaeval precedent.  Externally, the junction between the nave and chancel is marked solely by a buttress on each side, while inside, in the absence of a chancel arch, this function is carried out by the remains of the rood stair, cut into the N. wall.  The church’s only other old features of note are the two, two-light and almost round-arched, early fourteenth century windows with reticulated tracery, one on each side of the nave, and the tower bell-openings with pointed arches and reticulated tracery, which led Pevsner and/or Bill Wilson (in the “Northwest & South Norfolk” volume of The Buildings of England, pub.  Yale University Press,  2002) to describe the whole tower as Decorated.   The octagonal font has a variety of carvings in shallow relief around its bowl and stem, including blank Perpendicular tracery, and quatrefoils, shields and the Star of David in circles, set out seemingly at random.  The church contains a number of wall monuments, all too minor to warrant description.